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Progesterone

 

Insource Diagnostics

Progesterone

Alternative Names
  • Progesterone
  • S

Test Code: 4008

CPT: 84144
Tests Included Progesterone
Use Both men and women produce low levels of progesterone, a steroid hormone in the adrenal cortex. Progesterone is important, not only as a hormone, but also as the precursor of the estrogens, androgens, and adrenocortical steroids.1 In women, progesterone can be used to verify a viable pregnancy.  Progesterone is also a powerful counter-balance for estrogen. Progesterone is also an intermediate precursor in the production of testosterone, E2, and other sex steroids, mineralocorticoids, and glucocorticoids. Estrogen dominance, as progesterone begins to decline in early menopause, can be a cause of some of the early symptoms experienced with menopause. As a result hormone replacement therapies (HRT) have been developed with varying amounts of estrogen and/or progesterone (progestin) to counter-act some of these effects. Normal progesterone levels also appear to play a role in the maintenance of healthy thyroid hormone levels. Because of its regulatory role in cellular functions (progesterone receptors are present on many cells) there is a great interest in researching the effect of progesterone maintenance with age in both sexes. The role progesterone plays in men is not fully understood, but research indicates it may play a role in reducing the conversion of testosterone to DHT, which in turn plays a role in the development of prostate cancer. Progesterone is also an intermediate precursor in the production of testosterone, other sex steroid, and mineralocorticoids. Because of its regulatory role in cellular function (progesterone receptors are present on many cells) there is a great interest in researching the effect of progesterone maintenance with age in both sexes.1
Clinical Utility In general, increasing progesterone levels are indicative of viable pregnancies. Ultrasonography is required to confirm viability at low progesterone levels. Serum concentrations are relatively constant at 8-10 weeks gestation, unless the pregnancy is failing, which can be signaled by decreasing progesterone values. After 10-12 weeks, levels increase more rapidly, but serum progesterone determinations are not considered useful for diagnoses in late pregnancy.2,3
Intended Patient Population 18+ and Older Adult Males & Females
Patient Preparation None Specified
Sample Serum
Tube Red, Tiger
Volume 4mL Whole Blood (1mL Serum)
Min Sample Volume 0.5 mLs
Reference Ranges M ≥ 18 yrs old; ≤ 2.06 ng/mL
F Follicular ≥ 18 yrs old;  ≤ 0.89 ng/mL
F  Ovulation ≥ 18 yrs old; ≤ 12.00 ng/mL
F Luteal ≥ 18 yrs old; 1.80-24.00 ng/mL
F  Post-Menopausal ≥ 18 yrs old; ≤ 0.20 ng/mL
F  Pregnant 1st Tri ≥ 18 yrs old;  11.00-44.00 ng/mL
F  Pregnant 2nd Tri ≥ 18 yrs old; 25.00-83.00 ng/mL
F  Pregnant 3rd Tri ≥ 18 yrs old;  58.00-214.00 ng/mL
Units ng/mL
Test Methodology Chemiluminescent Immunoassay
Test Turnaround Time 7 Days
Limitations None Specified
Shipping Requirements Refrigerated
Specimen Stability 7 Days RT
7 Days RF
Reject Criteria 0
Laboratory Developed Test (LDT) Yes
CMS Guidance None
References 1. M. Oettel and A. K. Mukhopadhyay, Progesterone: the forgotten hormone in men? The Aging Male 2004;7:236–257

2. Carson SA, Buster JE. Ectopic Pregnancy. New Engl J of Med 1993; Vol 329, no. 16: 1174-1181.

3. Fuchs F, Klopper A. Endocrinology of Pregnancy, 2nd Edition 1977; 6: 99-122.