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ALP

 

Insource Diagnostics

ALP

Alternative Names
  • Alkaline Phosphatase
  • ALP
  • ALK PHOS
  • Alkp

Test Code: 4502

CPT: 84075
Tests Included ALP
Use The precise metabolic function of ALP has not yet been fully elucidated, however the enzyme is associated with hepatobiliary disease and bone calcification.
Clinical Utility Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is present in almost all body tissues, located at or in cell membranes. It occurs at particularly high levels in interstitial epithelium, kidney tubules, bone (osteoblasts), liver and placenta. ALP originates in approximately equal proportions from the liver and the skeletal system

Reduced levels of ALP are found in familial hypophosphatasia, hypoparathyroidism, achondroplasia, adynamic bone disease in dialysis patients, pituitary dwarfism, chronic radiation sickness and malnutrition

Increases in total ALP are either due to physiological cause, or by diseases of the liver or bone.  Although moderate elevations may be seen in Hodgkin's disease, congestive heart failure, ulcerative colitis, regional enteritis, and intra-abdominal bacterial infections. Physiological increases in ALP are found in pregnancy from the 2nd trimester onwards due to placental ALP, in growing children due to bone ALP and postprandially in individuals with blood groups B and O, who are secretors of blood group substance H (intestinal ALP).
Intended Patient Population 18+ and Older Adult Males & Females
Patient Preparation None Specified
Sample Serum, Plasma
Tube Red, Green, Tiger 
Volume 4mL Whole Blood (1mL Serum/Plasma)
Min Sample Volume 0.1 mLs
Reference Ranges M & F ≥ 18 yrs old; 30-120 IU/L
Analytical Measurement Range 8-1580 IU/L
Critical Values  
Units IU/L
Test Methodology Quantitative Enzymatic
Test Turnaround Time 1 Day
Limitations Alkaline phosphatase results alone can be misleading
Shipping Refrigerated
Specimen Stability 6 Days RT
6 Days RF
Reject Criteria Gross Hemolysis, Anticoagulants other than heparin
Laboratory Developed Test (LDT) Yes
CMS Guidance None
References 1. Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry. Edited by CA Burtis, ER Ashwood. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Company, 1999